What is a Small Claims Court?

In Nebraska, small claims court is a division of county court and the hearings are conducted by a county judge. Small claims court provides a prompt and inexpensive way to resolve minor disputes. The amount owed or dollar value of property may not exceed the maximum amount of $2,700. More

Filing a Small Claims Court?

Before you file a small claims suit make sure that you have some proof of the debt such as a receipt, note, bill of sale, warranty or witness. To start a small claim, you must file a claim form with the clerk of the county court. The amount of the claim may not exceed $2,700. More

Small Claims Trials

The plaintiff and the defendant need to prepare for trial and should bring all witnesses and necessary papers to court. After both parties have presented their witnesses, testimony and evidence, the judge will make a decision, called a judgment. More

Witnesses at a Small Claims Trial

Witnesses are people who come to court to tell what they have seen or heard. These people should either be witnesses who saw what happened or experts on the subject matter of the claim involved. Whether you are the plaintiff or the defendant, you may bring witnesses to trial to support your story. More

After Small Claims Court

Generally, the judge's decision will be announced at the end of a small claims trial. The judgment will specify which side prevailed and if money damages are being awarded. If either party is dissatisfied with the decision, the case can be appealed within 30 days after the entry of judgment. More

Collecting the Judgment

The small claims process isn't necessarily over just because you filed a claim, went to trial and won a court judgment. You may need to take action and spend money to enforce the judgment. The court will not collect the judgment for you. More

Alternatives to Small Claims Court

In Nebraska, there are several alternative to suing in small claims court. You can try to settle the case out of court, you can participate in mediation, you can file a complaint with a government agency or you can retain an attorney to represent you in county court. More

Tagged as: Consumer Law, Contracts, Real Estate